These Are A Few Of My Favourite Things: JUNE 2020

Ah 2020. The good thing is, I don’t think it can get much worse. Between a huge restructure at work, losing work, the end of a relationship and working out living arrangements, it’s been a challenging month. I’m ok and I’m at peace with the direction everything is moving. It’s always the straw that breaks the camels back so it’s been the tiniest things that set me over the edge, but all in all, I’m doing ok. Despite the challenges and setbacks, I’ve been really lucky to have the support of friends and family to guide me through.

Earlier in the year, when things were a bit out of control, I started thinking ‘ok, just one day at a time,’ but now it’s suddenly July? While it’s important to focus on the now and work on what’s in front of you, sometimes you need to look ahead to take control of what you want in life. Whether it’s booking a weekend away, going to visit a friend or going for a long walk on the beach, balancing now and the future can be difficult but when you get it right, things start to feel normal again.

Working from ‘home’ home

After a big shake up at work, and after working from home for several months, something had to change. So I went ‘home’ home, up to Port Stephens to work for a week up there. It did me the world of good! Being able to finally separate work from my living space, be around family and catch up with old friends, it was just what I needed. Plus, with Mum living somewhere so beautiful, the motivation was certainly running high!

Adventures at home

Elizabeth then came down to Wollongong for a weekend and we were determined to make the most of the gorgeous weather and get out and about. We did the Kiama – Gerringong coastal walk, which is absolutely gorgeous but far out it’s a long walk!

The next day we headed on a little adventure to Bowral. We were lucky enough to find a spot for lunch because damn it was busy. I guess that’s what happens after people have been locked up for a few months, they jump at the first opportunity to get out and about!

I then had a visit from Dad before he moved off to start a new job, and was also paid a visit by the lovely Chloe. Of course, there were a few sunrise walks, swims and coffees in there with friends around the good old lighthouse which in all honesty, is the best start to the day anyone could ask for. Soph and I also conquered Sublime (which I haven’t done in a while) and my calves are still killing me from it! I’m glad I had her there to keep me going.

A surprise

So my friend Steph had a brilliant plan to go and surprise Chantelle down in her gorgeous home in Broulee! So Steph, Jas and I hopped in the car and road tripped down the south coast to surprise lil Chantelle. I think we got her pretty good! The whole weekend was simply gorgeous! We walked along the beach and explored her area, we got coffee and watched pelicans, spotted whales and attempted to ride rip sticks, and then cuddled up by the fire with wine and snacks. We even braved it and jumped in the water for a quick dip! To top it all off, we got a delicious meat pie in Mogo before we came back to Wollongong. It was a much needed getaway and I was so stoked to spend a night away with beautiful people.

Books

A Long Petal Of The Sea, by Isabel Allende
I really wanted to commit to reading books from around the world to learn more about the lived experiences – especially of women- in all corners of the globe. So when I cam across this book, telling the story about the Spanish refugees that boarded a ship commissioned by Pablo Neruda to Chile, I knew I had to learn about this fascinating part of history.

REVIEW: A Long Petal of the Sea by Isabel Allende - The Booktopian

Three Women, by Lisa Taddeo
Yes, yes, YES! A book about women’s sexuality and desire. Enough said. As the name implies, it tells the story of three women and explores their journey to find love, confidence and truth.

Three Women by Lisa Taddeo review — sex in the USA | Saturday ...

How We Disappeared, by Jing-Jing Lee
This is a heartbreaking story of a woman’s experience in Japanese occupied Singapore and the horrendous abuse she endured as a comfort girl. Again, this was a part of history that I didn’t know much about and I was seriously captivated by her story. It’s an incredible book about war, trauma, family and healing and would absolutely recommend it.

Review: How We Disappeared by Jing-Jing Lee – Retrospect Journal

Flicks

The Farewell
This is a must see-film and is a movie I’ve been thinking about for weeks since seeing it. It tells a story of a young woman who returns to her family roots in China who must comply in keeping a secret from her Grandma about her Grandma’s health. It’s a beautiful exploration of culture, tradition, philosophy and family, and it is simply stunning. My question for you is…. would you tell?

Bloggers, Vloggers and Podders

Kara and Nate
I’ve been following these guys for a long time now and I have been loving their vlogs from their trip to Antarctica! It’s been a great way to escape and follow their journey from earlier in the year to the incredible world of the Antarctic.

Quotes

So 2020 has basically been summed up by uncertainty. And as someone who usually prides themselves on being spontaneous, adventurous and willing to dive into the unknown, the encroachment of uncertainty in my ‘normal’ everyday life has been pretty intense. I love this little reminder that uncertainty and challenges bring with it growth and strength.

So, the remainder of 2020 – listen up! It will be better, I will be stronger, I will connect with myself and people around me, I will set goals and push myself, I will go slow and take time to do things that are important to me. Deep breath, let’s do this.

Transform your health and wellbeing: Will Grant from Ghetto Movement

[This article originally appeared on Twenty Something Humans]
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My alarm sounds at 6:00am. Fuck what day is it? What do I have on? Why am I up so early? It’s still dark outside as I head down to the café at North Wollongong beach to meet up with Will Grant, creator and owner of Ghetto Movement.

 

 

Blessed with a golden sunrise, we settled in for our interview. I ordered a long black and Will ordered a peppermint tea and a bacon hash-brown brekky burger. Yep, herbal tea and a burger, what a perfect way to sum up Will. He’s a newly-wed, a yogi and a business owner with a baby on the way, but his busy personal life doesn’t put a dampener on his ambitions, in fact, he’s hungry for more!

Will caught up with Twenty Something Humans to share his thoughts on health, philosophy, personal growth and working in pursuit of a balanced life, all the while chowing down on his brekky roll as we watched a beautiful sunrise over the ocean.

What were you like after high school and in your early 20s?

I was your stock standard 21-year-old. I loved footy, partying and drinking. I was a little bit chauvinistic to be honest; unfortunately that was the ‘cool’ way to be. From 18 onwards the footy boys and I had the ‘Ben Cousins’ mentality. I had insight into the world of an athlete who could drink, party and then go to a training session. That’s what a lot of us boys based ourselves on, it was so self destructive and eventually it will catch up on you. I guess you could say that my attitude towards wellbeing was pretty non-existent.

Adding to that, I was a tradie and that job really didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle either. We were emotionally, physically and mentally disconnected. There was a lot of mental pressure in that industry, trying to live up to that tough ‘blokey’ expectation while being hazed and picked on. It’s one way to get thick skin but it’s not the type of environment I thrive in.

  

How did you begin dabbling in yoga?

Between the ages of 21 and 25 I had three shoulder reconstructions. Adding to the tradie lifestyle and the ‘Ben Cousins mentality’. I really wasn’t healthy. It wasn’t until after my 3rd shoulder reconstruction in 2015 and meeting Emma (his now wife), that it all clicked and I realised I’m not invincible and that I didn’t want to keep up that unhealthy and destructive lifestyle.

When I walked into my first yoga class it was about 90% girls and it was incredibly intimidating. After I’d got the hang of it, I’d post my flows onto Instagram and one day I received a message from a mate’s Mum who asked if I would teach a yoga class. I thought, why not give it a go?

My first yoga class was an absolute disaster. I kept forgetting my words, I wasn’t too confident and was really embarrassed. I thought that was my yoga career over. Luckily, I had some really supportive people around me who encouraged me to jump back on the horse and my second class went pretty damn well. That’s when I started Ghetto. I started out teaching 2 or 3 classes a week and later this year we’ll start doing 30 classes a week!

 

How was it going into a class that was predominantly filled with females?

It was honestly quite intimidating. At first most of my mates would say things like ‘aw we know why you’re going to yoga!’ and chuckle along. But I promise I was really there for the yoga! I wanted to make sure that guys felt just as welcome in our classes as girls. That gender divide is something I’ve been really conscious of. In fact, we’re starting some jiu jitsu which is predominantly male dominated.  I wanted to flip it on its head and encourage women to get involved. Not only are women feeling stronger and more empowered from it, but it breaks down those barriers that often exist in the health and fitness industry.

Where did the name ‘Ghetto’ come from?

My mate had an old backyard gym that we used to call the ‘ghetto’ gym. Everything was 5th hand a bit rusty. When thinking about what I wanted my company to be, I wanted to be able to incorporate mobility and movement and we thought why not Ghetto? And it just kinda stuck despite some criticism.

When you’re starting out, people sometimes unintentionally give you the ‘best’ advice based on their mistakes, but you need to make your own mistakes, fuck things up and make the wrong decisions so that you’re equipped to make the right decisions later on in your career. It’s hard not to take things personally, but the quicker you realise that people want to see you succeed, the thicker your skin will grow and the more resilient you’ll become.

 

What inspired you to start a podcast? In case you weren’t busy enough.

I had been receiving acupuncture sessions from my friend. Before and after our sessions we’d have some great conversations! One day we were talking and wondered why people weren’t having these conversations every day. We thought let’s have these conversations and record them. The idea for the podcast is a modern take on philosophy. We wanted to share our thoughts and experiences and try to inspire others to have those conversations as well. So that’s how we began The Modern Monk! It’s another avenue for Ghetto, and myself, to grow and evolve.

 

How’ve you got to where you are today?

I really wouldn’t be where I am today without my wife Emma and my family. I really can’t even put it into words. So much of my time and energy goes into Ghetto and that’s an emotional investment. When you come home a bit tired and drained, you can’t always bring it. It’s made me realise the importance of the saying “you only get what you give”. Without Emma, I don’t think we’d be sitting here having this interview. We got married at sunrise at the start of the year and we’ve got a baby due in November. I’m really excited to see how a baby influences our life and adds to our relationship!

“Exhaust every opportunity to make it happen. Don’t half arse it, go all the way! Try and fail and try again…you never know.”

So you’ve got your peppermint tea and your bacon brekky burger, what advice do you have for balance?

I think people fail when they set themselves up to fail. You’re not always going to fit the idea of what people think you should be, but you have to stop and enjoy yourself. People think I’m vegan and I’ve tried it but my body didn’t respond well. I don’t believe in beating yourself up for certain life decisions. It’s important to have those quality times with your mates. I had a little espresso martini night last night and I wouldn’t change it for the world. I try to employ the 80/20 principle. 80% of the time I’m the Modern Monk, 20% of the time I’m 21-year-old Will and that’s OK.

I think it’s really important to have balance and I’m sure a baby will be a great challenge to this balancing game, but I don’t want to give up what I’m passionate about. I can’t see why my kid can’t be a part of this journey? I think that’s where we’d like to move Ghetto and I think there’s definitely a gap in that industry. I want to make Ghetto fun, healthy and enjoyable for the whole family.

What plans do you have for Ghetto moving forward?

Big plans! Last year we had our Ghetto retreat where a group of us went up the coast to unplug and connect with ourselves and like-minded people. We want to recreate this and make it bigger and better, hopefully sneaking in a little Bali retreat! At Ghetto HQ, we want it to be a one stop shop for all things health and wellbeing. We’ll be opening a little café, we’ll have some acupuncture and massage and our movement space. We’d love a huge community book shelf as well. So yeah, we’ve got some big plans!

Famous last words?

Exhaust every opportunity to make it happen. Don’t half arse it, go all the way! Try and fail and try again…you never know.

 

 

 

Images: www.ghettomovement.com and @ghettomovement.

Tacos & Tequila: Week 1 In MEXICO CITY

Mexico, that country that speaks Spanish, is renowned for its tacos and tequila and apparently Trump doesn’t like people from there. That’s about the extent of my knowledge of Mexico before arriving and commencing my studies in its capital, Mexico City. So how did I end up here? Well you may recall that around this time last year, I was completing a short course in La Rochelle, France, with a company called AIM Overseas (you can read about my experiences in France here). And after having such a life changing and incredible experience in France, I looked into their programs to see how I can escape another Australian Winter.

That’s when I came across their program taught at the University of La Salle in Mexico City titled ‘Immigrants, Human Rights & Mexican Society.’ Damn what a mouthful hey! Since I’m studying International Studies with Communications & Media Studies, I’ve always been fascinated, concerned and frustrated with current social and political perspectives towards migration, especially of refugees desperately trying to reach Australia. After finding out that I could receive a second OS Help Loan, I found myself being accepted into the program and on my way to Mexico City to study something that I’m deeply passionate about.

So here’s a look into what happened in our first week in Mexico City!

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Taking in the view of a city of 22million

Arriving

Arriving in a new destination, particularly one you’ve never been to before and don’t speak the language, can be extremely daunting. Luckily, La Salle organises an airport pick up. So there was someone at the airport to greet me with a friendly ‘Hola!’ From there, I joined a crew of other students in my program and in the Public Health Program (another AIM Overseas program offered at La Salle), and we filed onto the bus to take us to our new homes. Our ‘Immigrants’ group is staying at a lovely hotel in the funky, safe and colourful neighbourhood called La Condesa. I met my roomie, Rosie from the University of Melbourne. She’s a red head too, so we came to the understanding that they matched us based on our hair colour – but we get along really well so AIM definitely did a great job.

Across our arrival weekend, I met the other students in the program from all different degrees and from universities all across Australia. This diversity, I could tell, would be extremely valuable when it comes to discussing such a complex topic of migration. And to top it off, everyone is like minded and passionate about the same thing as you, so it’s safe to say that everyone is pretty damn cool.

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The colours of La Condesa, our funky neighbourhood

Classes

On Monday morning we were escorted to the university so we could take notes on directions. Luckily La Salle is a quick 10-15minute walk away from the hotel. Monday was our Orientation day where we were given a tour of the university and neighbourhood, we discussed our schedule for the three weeks, took our photos for our student ID’s and had an awesome welcome lunch.

Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday were quite intense days of classes. We covered everything from Contemporary Mexican Society, Mexico-US Migration Management and Human Rights and Legal Issues surrounding Migration. Tuesday and Thursday afternoon we had our crucial ‘Survival Spanish’ classes where we covered important topics like how to order a beer and make sure you don’t order the super spicy tacos! All of our classes have been taught by extremely passionate and inspiring professor’s making the long days of class very engaging, interesting and informative.

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Some of the sites and colours you can expect to find downtown

Professional Site Visits

As much as this course is academic, it is equally practical where we get to immerse ourselves in the realities for many migrants and refugees arriving to Mexico. On Friday, we visited ‘Casa de los Amigos’ and ‘Casa Tochan’, both are houses providing support and accommodation for newly arrived migrants and refugees. At Casa de los Amigos, we were given a tour of their facilities and a presentation going through some of the services they provide these people. They receive migrants and refugees mostly from Central American countries like Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala, however when we visited they had several refugees from Somalia and Cameroon. It just goes to show that as long as there is conflict and danger, people will go to all lengths to find somewhere safe for themselves and their families.

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Outside Casa de Los Amigos

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Kindness is a universal language

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After our presentation from Casa de los Amigos

After Casa de los Amigos, we headed to Casa Tochan, a much smaller house, yet doing some pretty incredible things and making a real difference to those looking for support, shelter, food, services and kindness. At Casa Tochan, I met three Honduran refugees, aged 17, 19 and 22. They told us their stories (with the help from a translator) and it was an incredibly powerful, emotional and confronting experience. One of the young boys entire family had been murdered in Honduras and therefore, he was escaping out of fear of being next. It was all very raw and emotional, yet the part that I’ll never forget was when another girl on the program asked how they felt with us coming to visit Casa Tochan. They responded that they were so grateful because it makes them feel like there’s people out there that actually care about them and the situation they’re in. I must admit, I spent a lot of the afternoon wiping away tears from my eyes because I was so overwhelmed with their kindness, hope and strength. The reality of looking someone directly in the eye and creating a bond that transcends language, culture or class is an experience that can never be taken away and to those young boys that I had the absolute honour of meeting, I will never forget their bravery.

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The mural painted in the common area at Casa Tochan

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Our group and awesome tour guides

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A mural on the street near Casa Touchan painted by migrants. This bird is the national bird of Honduras and it represents the freedom they’ve gained from spreading their wings.

Other Events

Friday afternoon we were treated to a salsa class, a fun way to lift spirits and get in a good work out. For anyone thinking that salsa is all about the skirts, you’re wrong. Be prepared to sweat!

This weekend was a hectic weekend of soaking up a lot of culture and history. On Saturday we headed to the famous Pyramids! Walking among thousands of years of history sure was memorable. On the way back to the city, we stopped at the Basilica de Guadalupe, the second most important Catholic religious site, the first being the Vatican.

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Rosie and I conquering the Sun Pyramid

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The Immigration group & Public Health group after galavanting all around the Pyramids.

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The 1st and 2nd Basilica de Guadalupe. Because of the ground it’s built on, the buildings are actually sinking, meaning that not many buildings are straight. But it sure adds character.

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On Sunday we were completely immersed in the hustle and bustle of Mexico City and given a tour of downtown. We visited the Cathedral, the old palace with murals by Diego Rivera (OMG fan girl!) and Templo Mayor. To add to the craziness of downtown, there was also a really popular football match on where they had big screens everywhere!

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One of my very good friends actually lives in Mexico City. His name is Victor and we met when he came to Wollongong on exchange in my first year. 3.5years later, he was showing me around his home town, complete with tacos, tequila and pulques. Being reunited with old friends is definitely one of the best things about travel and I’m so grateful that he’s been able to show me around such an incredible city.

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Victor and I

Well I honestly don’t know where times gone. 1 week down, 2 more to go. One thing I’m really realising is just how fortunate I am to be given such a unique opportunity of studying one of our century’s most complex and urgent movement of people, in a country that is so heavily involved in the process, whether it be sending, receiving or simply a transit for people, Mexico and immigration go hand in hand. In the 1 week I’ve been here, I’ve learnt more about Mexico City and Mexican Society than I have in my whole life and I’m quickly learning that there’s much more to this incredible place than tacos and tequila (yet still very important).

[You can follow my adventures on Instagram @aworldlyaddiction]

 

The Thing No One Tells You About EXCHANGE

So somehow time has flown so quickly that it’s been 3 months since I had to say au revoir to Montreal and finish up my exchange (if you missed what I got up to – you can check it out here). So now uni has started (we’re somehow in Week 4?!), life back in Wollongong is in full motion and exchange feels somewhat of a dream.

Everyone always talks about how amazing exchange is. How it’s the best time of their life. How you’re going to make friends for life, drink too much, see wonders of the world, get your Instagram popping and how it’s going to change your freakin life! And all of this is true, and these are just some of the many reasons that I encourage everyone to seek the opportunity to study abroad and travel.

But in all honesty, I wasn’t prepared for the complete confusion, doubt and insecurity I faced at home and within myself when I returned to Australia. I’ve heard about reverse culture shock before, and I’ve lived away from home before and I knew something like this was coming… but it still smacked me in the face.

Whilst I know the following thoughts are natural and silly, at the time I was dealing with these thoughts, the stress and anxiety was real. My biggest fear was surround my friends.

Was I going to lose my friends that I’d just made in Montreal? Would they still be interested in my life back in Australia? Would they make time to talk to me? Would I make time to talk to them? Would my friends back home accept the new me? Would they even notice that I’ve changed? Would I even have my old friends back home? 

These (thankfully) were all dealt with and overcome when I saw my friends back in Australia again and I was overcome with happiness, gratitude and joy. Plus, being able to FaceTime and Snapchat my friends back in Montreal, it reassured me that these friendships are strong and real. And it actually made me appreciate them even more – the fact that they care about my life over here and they’re willing to put in the effort to keep in touch and keep the friendship alive.

My other concern was about my identity and personality, leaving me asking ‘who am I?’ I slowly saw myself, my ideas and my values change over the course of the time that I was away. I was exposed to problems and issues I’d never heard of, listened to stories of strength, injustice and survival, changed my core values, altered my ideas… all that cheesy stuff associated with going through a life changing experience. And you’re determined to hold on to it all, bring it all to your life back home and just be a freakin awesome changed woman.

But the reality is that you start to adjust back to your old life, old routine and old ways, and you can’t help but let some of those ideas go. You almost get trapped in between 2 versions of yourself, and you’re not really sure which one is the real you, or the one you want to move forward it. I guess everyone has these types of identity crises throughout their lives, but it’s especially apparent when you return from an adventure overseas.

So how do I move forward? Where do we go from here?

I think I’ll continue to romanticise my exchange, always giving me fun, beautiful and exciting memories to look back on. But my goal is to channel that feeling. The feeling that anything is possible, that anyone can be a friend, that your day could take you anywhere and that life is freakin beautiful. And I just need to accept that not everyone shares these ideas, but I can’t hold back who I am or what I want. I’ve got to remember to be fierce and do what sets my soul and heart on fire… chase and create that feeling.

 

 

 

 

 

 

These Are A Few Of My Favourite Things: NOVEMBER

November has been a rollercoaster!!! I finished up with uni for the session, moved house, went back home, have been working (nearly) full time, been in a global march and back and forth between Sydney countless times. And despite being free from uni work (for now) – I still had very limited time to blog! One of my favourite things to do and I couldn’t even take a few hours out of my day to do it! I was doing so well with my stats and working on growth – and then life just happened and suddenly it’s December (would someone mind filling me in on how that happened?). Anyway… despite having signed up for a summer session at university and basically working full time, I’m committing to blogging at least once a week. I pinky promise. OK, so let’s look back on the month that was November…

Sculptures By The Sea…

I had such an incredible time exploring the beautiful coastline of Bondi Beach with my housemates. It was a gorgeous day spent with gorgeous girls. We topped the day off with some retail therapy so it was a pretty awesome way to spend a weekend. You can read more about Sculptures by the Sea here. 

Moving House!

As uni came to an end for the year – so did our contract at uni accommodation. Lucky for me, my best friend and I moved into a share house around the corner (complete with a queen size bed and a pool).

Mumford and Sons Festival!

Held in the Domain, Sydney, Mumford and Sons not only brought themselves (gods) but a number of other artists like Meg Mac, Jake Bugg, The Art of Sleeping and The Jungle Giants to play in the city. Unfortunately the weather was less than perfect – but we still rocked out in the rain along with some new found Italian friends.

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Galavanting around Martin Place. 

My Sister Came to Visit!

I absolutely love my family, so you could imagine how excited I was when my little sister came to visit! It was one of the last times I got to spend time with her before she jetted off on her adventure to South America.

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My sister and I at City Beach in Wollongong

The People’s Climate March!

What an incredible experience!! Being a part of Australia’s largest Climate March to date! It wasn’t just in Australia, but towns, villages and cities around the world with people from all walks of life marched for Climate Action for Climate Justice. You can read more about the People’s Climate March here. 

Visiting Home

There really is no place like home. Luckily I managed to squeeze in a little weekend trip to beautiful Port Stephens. Better yet, I got to show one of my Norwegian friends around and watch him absolutely lose it over pelicans and koalas!

Love Yourself

It’s not a recap unless there’s a song to go along with all of it! And it’s definitely Love Yourself by Justin Bieber. Sorry if I’ve accidentally become a Belieber but if he keeps producing music like this… I can’t help it!

Well – It was a great month but December is definitely a favourite of mine so I’m pretty excited to see what’s in store!

 

 

How to be the BEST modern day penpal

So you’ve met some pretty awesome people throughout your travels, adventures, nights out and days here there and everywhere… now what? The amazing people that I do meet, I just can’t deal with the fact that I may not see them again. And whilst I realise this is a reality for a lot of the people I do meet, the second best thing is to keep in touch and wish them the best with their life. I like to think I’m pretty good at keeping in touch with people. And I do so because I just want them to know how much I value our friendship. So here are my ways to be the best modern day penpal with your friends around the globe!

Modern day penpals. Source
Modern day penpals. Source

Take advantage of social media. There’s no need to explain how revolutionary social media is to our everday lives. But make sure you take advantage of it. At the double tap of a finger you can like someone’s Instagram photos, send a snapchat, or like a Facebook post. Comment on someone’s photo telling them how much you see missing their face around, or just to say you’re thinking of them. While it may seem like nothing, it really does mean the world.

Make a phone call. Again, with the cost of phone calls being so cheap these days, there’s no reason you can’t call your friend (probably wouldn’t recommend for international calls but within your country, there’s no excuse). It doesn’t have to go for hours, but sometimes… just hearing the sound of someone’s voice is so comforting. It’s easier than texting back and forth, you can express your emotions and if you close your eyes, it’s almost like they’re there with you.

If it's good enough for Carrie Bradshaw, then it's good enough for all of us. Source
If it’s good enough for Carrie Bradshaw, then it’s good enough for all of us. Source

(If you can’t call your friend because they do live oversees and those fees are just too high) Record your voice. OK give me a chance to explain. I know it sounds weird but it’s actually the coolest thing to do. My friend who’s always galavanting around Europe and I usually communicate via voice recordings on Whatsapp. The time difference makes it hard to organise a skype sesh (and the quality is always shitty), and she doesn’t post much to social media because she’s so busy…. soooo sending voice recordings back and forth is the best. I usually sit on my bed and pretend as though she’s sitting at the other end. Sure it may look weird to people walking past your room and listening to you talk to yourself, but it’s the best thing to receive.

Snapchat!!! It took me a while to jump on the snapchat wagon, but now that I am, I don’t know how I didn’t live without it? I love sending snaps to my friends that I don’t get to see all the time just to fill them in on what I’ve been up to. And I love I get a snap of them on a night out with friends, or jumping on a plane, of their breakfast or when they’re hungover. It just makes me feel like I’m there with them.

(And if you’re game) Physically write a letter. Do you remember the last time you received a physical handwritten letter or postcard? You become overwhelmed with excitement, joy, intrigue and happiness! Now imagine one of your friends having the exact same reaction because of something you sent! It’s absolutely beautiful! Whilst sending parcels is like murdering your savings account, sending a letter or postcard is super cheap and the reward is absolutely priceless. I still have a whole box filled with letters, notes and postcards from friends and family, and it’s something I’m going to keep forever.

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Source

So as much as it sucks that you’re not going to see these amazing people around everyday, by doing the above things, it will definitely keep the friendship alive.

Do you have any tips or tricks to keep in touch with your friends overseas? Let me know in the comments below?