The Audience Takes To The Stage

Tinder’s life source is its audience. Without its active prosumerism and participatory culture, it would cease to exist. Participatory Culture is defined, “where members feel some degree of social connection with one another” (Jenkins, 2006). The audience feel apart of a larger community as well as deep connections to other users they interact with. “In terms of personal development, identity, expression and their social consequences– participation, social capital, civic culture- these are the activities that serve to network today’s younger generation” (Jenkins, 2006)

Sourced from http://webbusinessagenda.com
Sourced from http://webbusinessagenda.com

Relationships are formed with Tinder and through Tinder. The user exerts a sense of hope and faith within Tinder, they are optimistic, excited and Tinder delivers. The user then creates an interaction with another user, heightening their experience and creating a dependency/sense of community with the app for social reassurance, “We have become a culture of people that are almost completely dependant on technology. The technologies that started out as aides to our existence have become vital to our everyday lives” (Digital Trends Staff, 2003). 

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Tinder was designed a dating app, with Co-Founder, Sean Rad, describing it as a “digital extension of our instinct to connect on a deeper level with one another” (Shandrow, 2014).  However, audiences share the ideology of using it for casual hook ups. Tinder “opens up chances to meet guys that you wouldn’t have had the chance to otherwise” (Declamatory, 2014). The target audience is for young adults who are mature enough to make sensible decisions, however, you only have to be 13 years old to register for the app (Tinder Terms of Use, 2013). Users interpret Tinder differently than anticipated and has been dubbed nothing more than a ‘shallow hook up app.’ “People don’t think of [Tinder] as online dating, they think of it as a game,” (Sandrow, 2014), never the less, did not alter the success of the app, due to audience engagement.

The success, ideologies and distribution of any technology is up to you, the audience, because without us, they would cease to exist.

References

Henry Jenkins, Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture:Media Education for the 21st Century Part 1, http://henryjenkins.org/2006/10/confronting_the_challenges_of.html#sthash.gaqNUjWI.dpuf, 20/10/06, accessed 3/02/14

Declamatory, Reddit, http://www.reddit.com/r/AskWomen/comments/1xdbg9/why_do_you_use_tinder/, March 2014, accessed 1/04/14

Kim Lachance Shandrow, Entrepreneur.com. http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/232211, 17/03/14, accessed 2/04/14

Tinder, Terms of Use, http://www.gotinder.com/terms/, last updated 26/03/14, accessed 2/04/14

Digital Trends Staff, “Dependency on Technology,”  http://www.digitaltrends.com/opinion/dependency-on-technology/#ixzz2xiNyG3FQ, written 2003, accessed 2/04/14

Controlling the Media or Mind?

“Whoever controls the media, controls the mind.” Jim Morrison

Sourced from http://inforrm.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/6460china-new-media.jpg
Sourced from http://inforrm.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/6460china-new-media.jpg

China is a beautiful country with rich culture, history and power. The 20th Century saw the end of dynasties and the rise of China as an international powerhouse, with mass production and technological innovation powering them as a leader in the world’s economy. The People’s Republic of China was established in 1949, where the Communist Party of China (CPC) reigned (china.org.cn). The CPC is extremely popular amougst the people of China, with faith and trust placed in the government. The Chinese Constitution states that, ‘citizens (are allowed) freedom of speech and press, but Chinese media regulations include vague language that allows authorities to crack down on news stories by claiming that they expose state secrets and thus endanger the country’ (Xu, 2014)’ The CPC has taken the dramatic step to censor, monitor and ultimately control the media in China. ‘The CPC exerts near complete control over the country’s 358 television stations and 2,119 newspapers—the primary media available to more than one billion Chinese citizens.’ (Esary, 2006)

Sourced from https://en.greatfire.org
Sourced from https://en.greatfire.org

The CPC has used ‘technical methods like bandwidth throttling, keyword filtering, as well as the wholesale blocking of access to websites’ (Esary, 2006), blocking over 2600 popular sites like Facebook, Youtube, Twitter and WordPress. There are also strict rules and regulations for journalists within and entering the country. Foreign correspondents must  ‘obtain permission before reporting in the country, to prevent journalists from reporting on potentially sensitive topics like corruption’ (Xu, 2014). 

This extreme control of the media by the CPC within China, reinforced by national military force, raises the complex question of is it right for one group/individual/company to control mass media? 

Sourced from http://ciccib.wordpress.com/2013/06/04/today-we-remember-the-massacre-in-tiananmen-square-photos/
Sourced from http://ciccib.wordpress.com/2013/06/04/today-we-remember-the-massacre-in-tiananmen-square-photos/

The CPC believe they are protecting citizens from capitalist/western ideas. In that regard, they are maintaining traditional values, beliefs and ideas exceptionally well. However, the interconnected, social media based society of the 21st century is an inevitable force and they are suppressing the free thinkers, the innovators and ultimately the truth. Censorship of certain events such as the Tiananmen Square massacre and September 11, doesn’t mean they didn’t happen. It only leaves people feeling confused and uninformed. This is a prime example of ‘whoever controls the media, controls the mind (Jim Morrison). People have the right to express their opinion and it is unacceptable to roll over these ideas in military tanks and ignore the thousands of voices behind the people.

As an inspired writer and citizen of this globe, I believe we need independence and diversity within the ownership of the media, in order to gain multiple perspectives, ideas, thoughts and understandings on certain events, people and decisions we make every day.

 

 

References

An Illustrated History of the Communist Party of China, http://www.china.org.cn/english/features/45981.htm, accessed 26/03/14

News of the Communist Party of China, http://english.cpc.people.com.cn, accessed 26/03/14

Beina Xu, Online Writer/Editor for Council on Foreign Relations, ‘Media Censorship in China,’ http://www.cfr.org/china/media-censorship-china/p11515#p2, written 12/02/14, accessed 26/02/14

Ashley Esary, expert on Chinese Media, ‘Freedom at Issue Report,’ http://www.freedomhouse.org/sites/default/files/inline_images/Speak%20No%20Evil-%20Mass%20Media%20Control%20in%20Contemporary%20China.pdf, written February 2006, accessed 26/03/14

China Forbidden News (youtube), China’s New Media Supervision Regulation, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p37mtW1LYC0, 18/04/2013, accessed 26/03/14