It’s Elementary Darling

The video above is not how we would traditionally view the epitome of intelligence in the London crime scene since 1887,  Sherlock Holmes. This is a fan made video with nearly 60 000 views and there are hundreds more scattering the internet. You only need to search as far as fanfiction.net to see just how much audiences love Sherlock Holmes. You might think… ‘why does the fan base matter?’ Well according to Laurie Penny, ‘the significance of fan fiction is that it often spins the kind of stories that showrunners wouldn’t think to tell, because fanficcers often come from a different demographic,’ (Penny, 2014). So from this perspective, the fans are just as important as the show itself.

Fan Fiction http://images4.fanpop.com/image/photos/23500000/Oh-John-sherlock-fanfiction-23533607-1000-714.jpg
Fan Fiction
http://images4.fanpop.com/image/photos/23500000/Oh-John-sherlock-fanfiction-23533607-1000-714.jpg

Recently there have been two versions of Sherlock Holmes, Sherlockthe British version and Elementary, the American version. The fan fiction revolves around the British version, Sherlock. But why does Sherlock have so many die-hard fans where Elementary does not? BBC writer Toby Finlay says ‘Sherlock Holmes is the closest thing we have to an authentic home-grown superhero’ and therefore fans, especially British fans feel a sense of pride towards the character of Sherlock. ‘He represents an idealised image of Victorian manhood, someone bound by a code of honour; a chivalrous, loyal adventurer – the intellectual knight errant, (Riddell, 2014). Sherlock Holmes has always been English, even Elementary (whilst set in New York) features a British Sherlock Holmes, and fans will never be able to remove that vital aspect of him from the character. The immense amount of fan fiction is proof that people strongly feel for the story and characters, therefore the incorporation of fan voices into the show epitomises the beautiful relationship Britain have with Sherlock Holmes.  ‘The Americans have Superman, Batman, the canon of comic book folklore. Our legendary British hero is Sherlock Holmes’ (Riddell, 2014).

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Elementary on the other hand is set in modern day Manhattan and has turned the traditional aspects of Sherlock upside down. With Watson being a woman (Lucy Liu) and featuring a muscular ‘bad ass’ Sherlock (Jonny Lee Miller) who sticks to American detective narratives as the ‘hard-boiled hero’ (BCM111 lecure, 2014). Elementary contains much more sexual desire and drug usage, something American audiences have always wanted. Whilst Elementary features plot twists to the original Sherlock stories, Elementary strongly resembles any other murder mystery show on television (like NCIS). Creator, Stephen Moffat describes Sherlock as ‘a love letter to Britain’ (BCM111 lecture, 2014)

Which one is better? The traditionally British Sherlock or the new aged Elementary? Will tradition prevail or will it make way to new and modern themes? Regardless of your preference the 19th Century hero Sherlock Holmes smoothly crosses cultural borders and is loved (and sometimes hated) by all.

The classic Sherlock Holmes http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-dbKZPgKjQFU/TuphO4xBcOI/AAAAAAAACC8/DrYk5W89Gc4/s1600/zz+Sherlock-Holmes-profile+silhoutte+007.jpg

 

References

Frew, C 2014, BCM111, ‘Sherlock and Elementary: Representing Englishness in Television Drama’,  accessed 17/09/14, University of Wollongong.

Penny, L 2014, New Statesman, ‘Laurie Penny on Sherlock: The adventure of the overzealous fanbase’, accessed 27/09/14, http://Http://www.newstatesman.com/culture/2014/01/sherlock-and-adventure-overzealous-fanbase

Riddell, F 2014, Times Higher Education, ‘Sherlock Holmes: a very British superhero’, accessed 10 October 2014, http://Http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/features/culture/sherlock-holmes-a-very-british-superhero/2010108.article

A Girl in Many Worlds

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Sourced from http://images.toywizard.net/0001/barbie-R9912-basic-asst.jpg

Transmedia Storytelling is the communication of a story across various platforms such as movies, social media, comics, video games and books, each of which explore a unique part of the story. When all different stories from all different platforms are combined, we have a more detailed and thorough understanding of the text as a whole. (, 2011).

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Mattel’s Barbie Franchise, is an example of transmedia storytelling due to the many unique platforms, ideas and concepts generated. The original form was a doll, designed for children to dress and roleplay. Generated from the Barbie doll was a whole world. There are various characters (Ken, Skipper), which live in different worlds (Fairytopia, Under the Sea) which are developed by various technology platforms (website, movies). Where people are used to consuming multiple aspects on a daily basis. (Jenkins, 2003) They are all interconnected and tell different parts of a worldwide story, relying on collective intelligence to produce a world in which everyone can immerse themselves.

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Sourced from http://img.wonderhowto.com/img/33/70/63493530208432

Because of the restricted nature and current hype of Tinder, it would be difficult to generate storytelling transmediality. However, using some imagination, there is definitely potential to create an encyclopaedic aspect of Tinder. Perhaps a movie of what occurs after someone is matched? Or a television series of different characters and their interaction with others because of Tinder? Perhaps the ‘swipe’ action could be adapted into other media technologies like Facebook or on television. There are already various Youtube videos which outline people’s unique interaction with others and many memes have been generated.

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Sourced from http://smashmoose.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/3tufz6.jpg

Transmedia storytelling “is a fantastic spine around which to build a more intensive interactive experience” (gauravonomics, 2013), in which it is expected more company’s and individuals will need to embrace in order to maximise audience engagement and participation. Personally, I am drawn to things which contain Transmedic Narratives because I feel apart of the action and accepted within a wider community with similar interests and values. It allows me to immerse myself in another world which I can access anyway I want, anywhere I want, which in today’s consumeristic society, is the expectations. 

References

Future of Engagement #7 : Transmedia Storytelling, People’s Insights Annual Report, MSL group, http://gauravonomics.com/transmedia-storytelling/,  written 11/03/2013, accessed 15/04/14

Henry Jenkins, Transmedia Storytelling, MT Technology Review, http://www.technologyreview.com/news/401760/transmedia-storytelling/, written 15/01/03, accessed 18/04/14