My Favourite Documentaries on NETFLIX

When Netflix & chill isn’t an option, sometimes, you just have to chill out with yourself and find a good movie to watch. And lately, I’ve been really getting into my documentaries. It might have something to do with feeling guilty when I actually do watch a film. So to compensate, I’ve been watching documentaries; an easy way to chill out and actually learn something new. So, if you too love a good doco and are looking for some new ones to add to your list, then look no further!

Chasing Ice (2012)

An amazing look at the dramatic changes happening as a direct result of Climate Change. A team of scientists venture to some of the most remote parts of the world, including Alaska, Greenland and Iceland. And having been to Iceland, it made watching this documentary even more incredible.

Perfect for: Those of you who love some beautiful cinematography, are interested in nature and concerned about climate change.

The True Cost (2015)

This documentary will make you close all of the online shopping tabs you have open. It follows your $10 top back through the supply chain to cotton farms in the US, to farms in rural India, to the factory workers in Bangladesh. It’s a fascinating look at where our clothes come from and the huge injustice of the fashion industry.

Perfect For: Those of you who love shopping the sales rack at stores.

Cowspiracy (2014)

Whilst at the People’s Climate March in Sydney last year, there were people everywhere holding signs saying ‘real environmentalists are vegan.’ Whilst I initially dismissed the thought straight away, it definitely planted a seed which prompted me to do some research for myself.

“Livestock and their byproducts account for at least 32,000 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year, or 51% of all worldwide greenhouse gas emissions.”

This just blew my mind. Whenever I used to think of CO2 emissions, I would always think of mining and fossil fuels. Whilst I’m not saying that Cowspiracy is what you should base all of your knowledge off of, because I personally believe it is highly propaganda-ish, but it is extremely eye opening to an issue not discussed in the media. And learning more about this issue inspired me to adopt a vegetarian diet.

Perfect for: Those of you curious about vegetarianism or veganism. Or alternatively, if you don’t want to subscribe to one of these labels, a reductionist (view TED Talk here)

Mission Blue (2014)

This documentary follows the story of Sylvia Earle, one of the world’s first oceanographers. She dedicated her life to the ocean, the life in it and the life that depends on it. Not only is Sylvia an incredibly inspiring woman, but the history and evolution of ocean exploration is looked at through a beautiful lens at a world just at our footsteps.

Perfect for: Those who have ever had their breath taken away by the beauty of the ocean. Also for those concerned for the future of our oceans and the effects that Climate Change has, especially in Australia.

Blackfish (2013)

This disturbing thriller showcases the issue of keeping majestic animals like Orcas in captivity in Sea World. Whilst I personally have issues with the portrayal being on the lives lost by several trainers at Sea World and not the orcas themselves, it still tells an incredibly powerful story of the harsh realities these beautiful animals face. As a result of this film, Sea World announced they would end their breeding program at the Orlando park. However, one of the main orcas in Blackfish, Tilikum, is suffering so much, that his health is rapidly deteriorating.

Perfect For: Those who are also passionate whale lovers and who see a huge breach of animal rights in the act of capturing, detaining and ‘training’ animals.

So there we go. Netflix has definitely provided the goods when it comes to documentaries. And if you have any suggestions, please let me know in the comments below!

Happy watching and learning!

 

Further Information

TED Talk on being a REDUCTIONIST

 

 

 

 

 

 

Doin’ It In A Dress

I was never one for school dresses. I remember when I changed primary schools in year 6, I wasn’t allowed to wear my preferred shorts and polo shirt to school. So instead, I had to wear a school dress. I resented putting it on every morning because I just wanted to wear shorts and be able to run around. At the time, I had no idea how valuable this school dress was to me. It is only now, that I realise the full potential, power and empowerment a school dress can bring to the world.

I am currently sitting in our University’s library, studying away for one of my final essays. And I’m wearing a school dress. Why you may ask? Well I’m doing it in a dress so girls in Sierra Leone can wear a dress and attend school too. It only costs $300 to send a girl to school for a year. And if she does attend school, she’ll less likely be married off before she’s 15, less likely to contract HIV/AIDS and is more likely to earn 10-25% more money for every extra year of schooling, and reinvest 90% of her income back into her family (OneGirl.org, 2015)

“Let us pick up our books and pens, they are our most powerful weapon.’ Malala Yousafzai

So in October, I’ll be wearing my school dress with pride in the hope that more school girls in Sierra Leone and other African nations can do the same. If you want to see me do something in my school dress, name your price, donate and I’ll do it.

If you want to do your part to help, you can donate directly to my page here – http://www.doitinadress.com/adelaide-haynes

I believe that every young girl has a right to education and unleash their knowledge, power, beauty and wonder onto the world. So let’s make this happen!

My super cute school dress with a difference
My super cute school dress with a difference

Elocution is Dead: Impacts of the Internet

Satellites, ISIS and elocution are not some of the first things I usually think of when I think of the internet. But they sure are to my Grandad. Building on my Grandad’s experiences of television in the home during the 1960’s, naturally the next step is to discuss the weird and wonderful internet to find out what sparks Grandad’s curious minds.

Satellites are a cause for concern. Source
Satellites are a cause for concern. Source

To engage in a more collaborative research practice I started by asking my Grandad what aspect of the internet he was interested in or concerned about, which immediately sparked conversation to flow. I must admit I was quite surprised when he immediately said that he noticed the GPS in his new car receives information from a satellite owned by the US military, which raised multiple questions of security and privacy.

“If they took the satellite away, what would happen?”

This is a very appropriate question, given the changing nature of the internet and technology. As Grandad said ‘people run businesses and rely on the internet in their everyday lives,’ so if anything were to happen to a satellite, a server or network, what would we be left with? I don’t know the question to the future of the GPS and our reliance on technology, but here is a brief history of the GPS and the military’s involvement.

I then asked what concerned him about younger generations use of the internet as he has grandchildren between the age of 10-16. ‘I’ve already noticed that the internet has affected young people’s spelling, reading and speaking properly. Elocution is dead.’ He is extremely worried about the effects of being addicted to the internet and games, again, I’m sure many parents and grandparents resonate with these concerns.

Concerns with teenagers and their devices. Source
Concerns with teenagers and their devices. Source

However, it isn’t all doom and gloom for the internet. Yesterday, my beautiful cousin gave birth to a healthy little boy. She lives in Queensland yet in a matter of minutes, a picture was posted on Facebook and my grandparents were able to look at their beautiful new grandchild. This is one of the reasons that Grandad thinks ‘the internet is a terrific aid for anyone wanting access to information, to keep in touch with loved ones far and wide, and allowing people to run a business from home.’ Further research explains that ‘older citizens able and willing to use the internet to communicate with their families and friends, and to maintain their independence and personhood.’ (Xie, 2003), the main reason my Grandparents are online.

I think the general public is quick to assume that older generations are a bit behind when it comes to technology, and whilst Grandad admits to being a little confused with some technological process, I think they’re a lot more knowledgeable with technology than we’d like to admit.

Next time I’m visiting, I’ll definitely be more observant of when, how and why they use the internet. I believe to engage in more collaborative ethnographic research, I could do a cross-comparison of Grandad’s versus my internet habits and see what similarities and differences we have. Something I would be interested in doing in the future.

So, Grandad would like to leave you with some words of wisdom regarding teenagers using the internet in the home.

“You must use the internet in common rooms so we can keep an eye on you, and if you don’t like it then too bad. We’re only trying to look out for you.”

***

The following video explores how social media is affecting the youth of today.

The following video takes a light approach to whether or not the internet is making us smarter or dumber-er.

For more information on collaborative ethnographic research, check out the following posts

BCM Alison – Ethnographic Research and its Value https://ambcm.wordpress.com/2015/08/16/ethnographic-research-and-its-value/

Flog My Blog Was Already Taken – You’re Never Alone With Collaborative Ethnography https://flogmyblogwasalreadytaken.wordpress.com/2015/08/17/youre-never-alone-with-collaborative-ethnography/

References

Xie, B 2003, ‘Older Adults, Computers and the Internet: Future Directions’, Gerontechnology Journal, Vol. 2, No. 4, http://gerontechnology.info/index.php/journal/article/viewFile/gt.2003.02.04.002.00/288

Bring Back Our Girls, Bring Forth Your Support

#Bringbackourgirls

Bring Back Our Girls has been a twitter phenomenon, capturing global attention on the 234 Nigerian school girls missing due to internal terrorist regimes. This horrendous incident occurred on the 15th April, taking a few weeks for awareness to capture the world. I became aware of this movement a week ago and have since actively followed, retweeted and researched the development of the #bringbackourgirls.

Sourced from http://rosearomas.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/mala.jpg?w=529
Malala Yousafzai showing her support. Sourced from http://rosearomas.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/mala.jpg?w=529

I personally support and participate in this online ‘clicktivism’ because being a young woman in the 21st century, I know and believe that education should be granted to all, regardless of race, religion, culture or gender. With the admiration of activist Malala Yousafzai and her powerful words “Let us pick up our books and our pens, they are the most powerful weapons,” (Yousafzai, 2013)I hope to one day be an activist involved with human and especially women’s rights. 

Clicktivism is the online activity of sharing, liking, commenting, retweeting information about a concern or cause, whereas activism is the physical act of doing something such as protesting. (thetrashlab, 2013) Despite the criticisms of clictivism being ‘slacktivists’, activism would not be possible without the online support of the clicktivists.

However, here I am, sitting at my computer screen, here in Australia, and not in Nigeria protesting and pressuring the government on a physical level. But does that mean that my support is insignificant? Despite the fact I may just be involved in the ‘clictivism,’ creating awareness is the biggest and most difficult step in order to make a difference. That’s why the involvement of high profile celebrities (as pictured below) furthermore perpetuates awareness and involvement.

 High profile people showing their support and creating global awareness, such as Justin Timberlake, Drake and Bradley Cooper Sourced from http://blog.lib.umn.edu/isoke001/gwss1005-2014/rmdbg.jpg
High profile people showing their support and creating global awareness, such as Justin Timberlake, Drake and Bradley Cooper
Sourced from http://blog.lib.umn.edu/isoke001/gwss1005-2014/rmdbg.jpg

 Whilst I might not be able to make a physical contribution to the issue in Nigeria and I am absolutely privileged to have the freedom, rights and opportunities to attend university (which is even financially supported and encouraged by the government), I am able to fully appreciate and maximise the chances I have here in Australia. The youth of the world are the future, (Strauss, 2011) we have power and we have the ability to make change, whether it be online or in the real world.

 

Further Related Readings/Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KsB2qtDaiRw

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/adam-grant/are-you-a-slacktivist_b_4390258.html

 

References

Yousafzai, M 2013, ‘Our books and pens are the most powerful weapons’, transcript United Nations, The Guardian, 12 July, accessed 07/05/2014, http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/jul/12/malala-yousafzai-united-nations-education-speech-text

thetrashlab, 2013 Slactivists vs. Activists (online video), 15 April, viewed 07/05/2014, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0EQFKKJBjwE

Strauss, J 2011, Youth movement in a culture of hoplessness, Aljazeera, 8 October, accessed 07/05/2014, http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/spotlight/occupywallstreet/2011/10/2011107172820297149.html