These Are A Few Of My Favourite Things: OCTOBER 2017

I’M FINISHED MY DEGREEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!! OMG! Words really cannot describe how I’m feeling (maybe a little hungover from all the celebrations) but damn 4 years, two degrees and I’m finally done! I’m sure with my new found spare time I’ll be blogging about how it actually feels. This month has been a roller coaster, finishing a degree and applying for another is stressful. But I made it and now I can finally relax and celebrate my achievement. Let’s have a look back on the tumultuous month that was October.

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💃🏻 Feeling Confident and Proud of Myself

OK so I know this is super lame and cliché, but this month I’ve felt incredibly proud of everything I’ve achieved across my 4 years at uni. And not just uni related, but in a lot of aspects of my life. This month I spoke at the National Leadership Conference, worked hard at work, have been smashing out my uni assignments, taking time for my friends, boyfriend and myself…. and I think I’ve made it out rather unscathed. I know it may seem a bit la di dah, but every now and again it’s important to take a step back and think, damn…. I’m doing well. And I think that’s what finishing a degree means.

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🇫🇷 French

For those of you who don’t know, French is my major for one of my degrees, and it’s definitely one of the skills I’ve struggled and worked extremely hard at. Learning a language is extremely difficult, and therefore it’s important you have a good support system around you. I’m incredibly grateful for my bobos who have supported me through this last and final year of French. Not only in the classroom, but helping me indulge in my obsession with cheese, by arranging wine and cheese nights out at the Throsby. I’m super proud of my level of French and it’s definitely one of the life skills I want to continue to improve. Alors merci beaucoup mes bobos, je ne survivrais pas sans vous. 

 

 

 

 

🎓 DEGREE!!!

I have officially submitted my final assignment for my Bachelor of Communications & Media Studies – Bachelor of International Studies (Deans Scholar) – Majors: Global Media, French Minor: Global Sustainable Development

Woooo!

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🎶 Tunes

BØRNS. Damn this track is absolutely fabulous. The dance moves are to die for, and the music is just stunning. Always puts me in such a good mood.

Demi Lovato. OK for any of you who know me quite well, you’ll know that this is absolutely, completely NOT the sort of music I usually go for. But DAMN this album is actually amazing. My friend Chloe and I secretly disclosed this info to each other. ‘Hey have you heard Demi Lovato’s new album?’ ‘Yeah!’ ‘OMG it’s actually good’ ‘OMG thank god you think that, I’ve been listening to it on repeat!’ 

🎥 Flicks

Lovelace. THIS FILM IS AMAZING!!! It’s an incredibly story and filmed in such an exciting yet deeply sad way. I’ve been finding some amazing flicks on SBS On Demand so make sure you keep an eye out there for some amazing flicks!

📗Books

So apparently I’ve been on a bit of a reading rampage this month… reading is so rewarding and relaxing I always try to take time before bed to do some reading and put my mind to rest for the night.

Bad Feminist – Roxane Gay. I’ve been wanting to read this book for such a long time and I finally got my hands on it. For anyone grappling with their identity as a woman, or as a feminist, I would highly recommend this book. It’s easy to read and broken into distinctive chapters that address a broad variety of issues such as race, assault, entertainment and identity.

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Violent Borders – Reece Jones. At the beginning of this book, Jones discusses a small Spanish city called Melilla. He then mentions that the city is actually located in Morocco. Literally stop what you’re doing and look it up on Google Maps, it will amaze you! He then discusses how Spain is a part of the EU and therefore migrants from Northern Africa risk everything trying to make it into the fortressed city of Melilla to land on EU soil and be processed correctly as refugees. You can read more about Melilla here (I honestly was so amazed by this!) but this book is a fantastic look at the current refugee crisis and examines how nations (even including Australia) are struggling to manage their borders.

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1984- George Orwell. MIND. BLOWN! I honestly couldn’t put this book down. It was miserable, depressing, gripping and real. I read it in about a week and I think I could’ve easily smashed it out quicker than that! Cannot recommend enough. Also after classic book recommendations, so if you’ve got them, send them through!

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📷 Bloggers and Vloggers

👼 Twenty Something Mummy. I’ve never met Lucy myself, but I grew up in the same area as her and have followed her on Instagram for quite a while. She’s recently started vlogging and I’m really enjoying watching her! It’s definitely content I’m not used to seeing as I don’t exactly follow many mums on Instagram, but I love her voice and think it’s a real value being added to the whole ‘Twenty Something’ millennial community. Definitely go check her out!

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💛 🌻 ✈️  Raya Was Here

I’ve always been a fan of Raya’s channel, but lately her Instagram has been POPPIN! I’m absolutely in love. She’s such a positive and bright person who is such an inspiration to so many people! And that yellow dress!

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📝 Quote

The following quotes translates to ‘we are our choices.’ Jean-Paul Sartre was a French writer who turned down the Nobel Prize for literature (yep I learnt that in my French class – impressed bobos?). But this really resonated with me. Each and every day we make choices, that determine how we feel, our attitude, feelings, outlook on life… Each and every choice we make has the power to change our lives. We are our choices, so take pride in these choices to live your best life.

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Well… what a month. It absolutely flew by I can’t believe it. In the blink of an eye, I’ve finished my degree. November holds some pretty exciting things in store so definitely watch this space because I have a hell of a lot more free time which means blogging and vlogging!

Much love!

Why It’s OK to be a Bad Feminist

Feminism has copped a lot of slack lately. It is now a term of derision and many people say ‘I believe in equlality, but I don’t identify as a feminist.’  There’s such a big anti-feminist movement that when you google feminist, one of the first things that appear is the website ‘Women against Feminism.’ And when did it become a bad thing to be a feminist? Perhaps the following video could be fuelling the anti-feminist fire.

Unfortunately, this has been watched over 700 000 times broadcasting incorrect and damaging information about feminism. Feminism has nothing to do with giving entitlements to women or trying to make them superior to men as she suggests in her I’m not a feminist because… photo. And that’s why knowing what feminism is and what it stands for is so important. And this is the same woman who claims that ‘the west does not have a rape culture.’ She has been misled to believe that feminism is a women only movement, and by her spreading this message to such a large audience, can be detrimental for feminism and what it stands for.

Emma Watson delivering her speech at the launch of the He For She Campaign. Source
Emma Watson delivering her speech at the launch of the He For She Campaign. Source

If you weren’t living under a shell last year, you would have heard Emma Watson’s speech for the UN’s He For She Campaign, which addresses the crucial role that men play in the feminist movement. And this is the most important part, men and women should work together to overcome gender inequality because men suffer from being ‘imprisoned by gender stereotypes’ as well (Watson, 2014). So, to clear up some things;

Feminism is not: ‘laziness, bitching on Tumblr and policing other people’s free speech’ (1), demonizing men (2) or special treatment (3)’ (women against feminism)

Feminism is: the belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of the political, economic and social equality of the sexes.

Source.
Source.

Many people are under the impressions that ‘they don’t need feminism because gender inequality doesn’t exist in our society’ or as Kayley Cuoco said ‘I’m not a feminist because I’ve never experienced inequality(Jones, 2014). Just because you personally don’t experience inequality, it doesn’t mean it’s not real. The UN’s Millenium Development Goals 2015 Report highlights that gender inequality is still experienced world-wide.

Women continue to face discrimination in access to work, economic assets and participation in private and public decision-making. Women are also more likely to live in poverty than men. In Latin America and the Caribbean, the ratio of women to men in poor households increased from 108 women for every 100 men in 1997 to 117 women for every 100 men in 2012, despite declining poverty rates for the whole region.’ (UN, 2015)

Germain Greer who is a leading Australian feminist, actually says that it is important that we don’t define feminism because by defining it, we are giving it limitations. ‘It’s important that feminism is allowed to evolve and change over time.’ (reference Q&A video) which can hopefully help overcome it’s exclusivity. However * argues that by having a more ‘dynamic definition it will enhance understanding and significance among men and women’ (Offen, 1988). This highlights the different ideas people associate with feminism and why it isn’t so simple to define or easily agreed upon.

Feminism is also generally associated with white, middle class women and excludes a person of colour or anyone else that doesn’t fit the criteria. Roxane Gay is what she calls a ‘Bad Feminist,’ because she does not fit the ‘traditional characteristics’ of a feminist of ‘being all, and having it all.’ Of course this raises many other questions regarding racism, however in the following TED talk, she discusses feminism and why she is a ‘Bad Feminist.’

The most significant part of her talk is where she proudly says ‘we can boldly claim our feminism. I’d rather be a bad feminist than no feminism because feminism gave me a voice.’ So regardless of what we call it, this is why we need it.

Personally, I am a feminist because I believe that all children have a right to education. Because women deserve the right to make decisions regarding their own body. Because I don’t want to be objectified or sexualised. Because men and women should work together to achieve equality. Because I am a young women who should have the opportunity to accomplish my dreams.

This is what a feminist looks like. Source
This is what a feminist looks like. Source

References

Jones, A 2014, ‘I’m not a feminist and I love feeling like a housewife’, Gawker, 12 December, http://gawker.com/kaley-cuoco-im-not-a-feminist-and-i-love-feeling-like-1676352429

Offen, K 1988, ‘Defining Feminism: A Comparative Historical Approach’, Signs, Chicago Journals, Vol. 14, No. 1, pp. 119-157

The United Nations Millenium Development Goals Report 2015, http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/2015_MDG_Report/pdf/MDG%202015%20rev%20(July%201).pdf

Further Information

Emma Watson’s speech

Q&A’s all women panel on How to be a Feminist